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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R35H2B

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Does chronic stress predict asthma in adolescents? Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
chronic stress
asthma risk factor
allostatic load
asthma
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Bahreinian, Salma
Supervisor and department
Kozyrskyj, Anita (Pediatrics)
Ball, Geoff (Pediatrics)
Examining committee member and department
Vander Leek, Timothy (Pediatrics)
Colman, Ian (School of Public Health)
Department
Department of Pediatrics
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-11-25T20:32:30Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Asthma is a common chronic condition in Canadian adolescents. Stress is a proposed risk factor for asthma development. Allostatic load (AL) is a composite measure of chronic stress exposure, and its role in the development of asthma in adolescents was the focus of this thesis. In study 1, we found a significant positive association between high AL and prevalent/incident asthma in adolescent boys, but not girls. Subsequently, in study 2, the effects of individual biomarkers that comprise AL index and their associations with asthma were evaluated. In boys, a combination of total cholesterol and cortisol predicted non-atopic asthma, whereas total cholesterol and blood pressure predicted atopic asthma. In girls, fasting insulin levels predicted non-atopic asthma. In summary, we demonstrated that sub-clinical levels of biomarkers increase the risk of asthma. These findings highlight simple measures of modifiable risk factors can be used by clinicians to predict asthma in adolescents.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R35H2B
Rights
License granted by Salma Bahreinian (bahreini@ualberta.ca) on 2011-11-25T16:26:07Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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