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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34Q6M

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Refractometric sensing with fluorescent-core microcapillaries Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
All-optical devices
Microcavity devices
Photoluminescence
Resonators
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Manchee, Kyle
Supervisor and department
Meldrum, Al (Physics)
Examining committee member and department
DeCorby, Ray (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Veinot, Jonathan (Chemistry)
Freeman, Mark (Physics)
Department
Department of Physics
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-28T04:12:48Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
A capillary-type fluorescent-core microcavity refractive index sensor based on whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances is presented. The device consists of a glass microcapillary with a thin layer of fluorescent silicon quantum dots (QDs) coated on the channel surface. The high index of the QD layer confines the electric field near the capillary channel and causes the development of WGMs in the fluorescence spectrum. Refractometric sensing was achieved in these fluorescent-core microcapillaries (FCMs) by pumping aqueous sucrose solutions through the capillary while measuring the fluorescence WGMs with a spectrometer. A finite-difference frequency-domain model was developed and used to study the performance of the FCMs. While the observed refractometric sensitivity and detection limit of the current device were inferior to competing technologies, FCMs offer other practical advantages, such as straight-forward fabrication, robust samples, and minimal instrumental requirements, all of which make FCMs an appealing technology for integration with lab-on-a-chip devices.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34Q6M
Rights
License granted by Kyle Manchee (kmanchee@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-27T17:52:12Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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