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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3377659X

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Print Culture in Victorian England: The Ottoman Empire at the Great Exhibition of 1851 Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
1851
narcissism of minor differences
punch
turkey
great exhibition
crystal palace
ottoman empire
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Hawkins, Tessa
Supervisor and department
Joan Greer (History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture)
Examining committee member and department
Boone, M. Elizabeth (History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture)
Hendrickson, Jocelyn (History and Classics)
Department
Department of Art and Design
Specialization
History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture
Date accepted
2013-05-30T09:33:24Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis provides a study of the Ottoman Empire’s display and citizens at the Great Exhibition of 1851 as represented by British print culture. Using official and satirical sources, it examines mediated images of the “Turk,” identifying and interpreting differences between English and Turkish cultures as represented before, during, and directly after the exhibition in primary sources such as the Official Descriptive and Illustrated Catalogue and Punch magazine. Using Western preconceptions and stereotypes, a “Turkish Other” character type was created and disseminated throughout British print media. This character type illustrated Turkish reforms instigated in the nineteenth-century which merged European ideals with Turkish cultural traditions; in doing so, the Ottoman Empire infringed on British national identity. To protect this cultural identity, British satire depicted exaggerated “Turkish Other” characters which, according to Freud’s theory of the narcissism of minor differences (as interpreted by Anton Blok), prevented violent physical conflict between these cultures.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3377659X
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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