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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30G3H62P

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Perceptions and Pressures: Legitimacy in Outreach Schools Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Isomorphism
Organisational Theory
Alternative Learning
Legitimacy
Outreach schools
Case Study
Insitution
Coupling
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Graham, Jackson C
Supervisor and department
Shultz, Lynette (Educational Policy Studies)
da Costa, Jose (Educational Policy Studies)
Examining committee member and department
Spencer, Brenda (Educational Policy Studies)
Shultz, Lynette (Educational Policy Studies)
Steinhauer, Evelyn (Educational Policy Studies)
Wallin, Dawn (Graduate Professional Programs, and Research)
da Costa, Jose (Educational Policy Studies)
Wallace, Janice (Professor Emerita at University of Alberta)
Department
Department of Educational Policy Studies
Specialization
Educational Administration and Leadership
Date accepted
2015-01-26T13:35:55Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Doctor of Education
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
This dissertation is an organisational case study of the legitimacy behaviours of two Outreach schools in Alberta, Canada. The study used Organisational Theory to examine how institutional processes, policies and practices impacted alternative education and in what way members of these schools experienced isomorphic pressure. The themes that emerged from the research included: Learning and Knowing, Responsiveness, Legitimacy, Power, Scarcity and Organisational Identity. These themes lead to the discussion norms and values highlighting and contrasting personalisation and isomorphism. The findings of this case study noted unintended tight coupling of Outreach schools with governing bodies and the significant blurring and overlapping of educational boundaries. The findings also noted legitimacy and status actions continued to drive the behaviours of organisations that do not have social capital. The notion of a “last stop” identified a significant cultural change within and outside of Outreach education. The phrase “dynamic coupling” was used to explain the fluid nature in which these schools were capable of moving from tight to loose coupling with other organisations according to the needs of the school. Finally, the case study suggested alternative education would continue to remain in the margins.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30G3H62P
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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