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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3X43R

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Mechanisms of Neonatal Porcine Islet Xenograft Rejection Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Porcine
Antibody
Diabetes
Co-stimulation
Neonatal
Islet
Natural Killer Cell
Xenotransplantation
Immunology
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Mok, Dereck
Supervisor and department
Gina R. Rayat (Surgery)
Examining committee member and department
Ray V. Rajotte (Surgery)
A. M. James Shapiro (Surgery)
Allan Murray (Medicine)
Department
Department of Surgery
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-05-22T15:27:07Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Islet transplantation has the potential to be an effective treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes. However, a shortage of human donor islets and the need for continuous immunosuppressive therapy currently limit this therapy to patients with brittle type 1 diabetes. Neonatal pigs may provide an unlimited source of islets for transplantation; however, the barrier of islet xenograft rejection must still be overcome. Understanding the mechanism of neonatal porcine islet (NPI) rejection will help to develop targeted therapies to prevent rejection. This thesis studied the early immune cells and molecules involved in NPI xenograft rejection, compared the role of NK cells in two models of islet xenotransplantation and investigated the role of T cell co-stimulatory and adhesion pathways in NPI xenograft rejection. Targeting these aspects of the immune response to NPI xenografts with short-term therapies may play a role in improving NPI xenograft acceptance and induce long-term xenograft survival.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3X43R
Rights
License granted by Dereck Mok (dmok@ualberta.ca) on 2009-05-22T03:42:27Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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