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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R33Q01

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Population-level responses of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to alarm substances and predator odour Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
alarm substances
predator-prey
predator odour
reproduction
fathead minnow
chemical ecology
population
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Jung, Jennifer
Supervisor and department
Tonn, William (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Erbilgin, Nadir (Renewable Resources)
Stacey, Norman (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-01-28T22:58:14Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Alarm substances, released by injured prey, and odours from predators, such as northern pike, are chemical cues associated with increased predation risk in aquatic ecosystems. In laboratory studies, individual prey can respond to the presence of such cues by reducing conspicuous behaviours, such as foraging and by seeking shelter. These responses may reduce growth and reproduction, which could have effects at the population-level. The objective of my study was to determine if alarm substances or pike odour have population-level effects on fathead minnow. In the cattle trough experiment, alarm substances and pike odour had no effect on breeding behaviour and recruitment of young; however, spawning occurred earlier with exposure to alarm substances relative to water controls. In a larger-scale pond experiment, alarm substances had no effect on reproduction or recruitment. Despite individual-level effects in the laboratory, exposure to alarm substances and pike odour had no impact at the population scale.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R33Q01
Rights
License granted by Jennifer Jung (jajung@ualberta.ca) on 2010-01-27T18:06:03Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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