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Soil Microbial Communities in Early Ecosystems Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
Reclamation
Microbiology
Glacier
Soil
Succession
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Hahn, Aria S
Supervisor and department
Quideau, Sylvie (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Foght, Julia (Biological Sciences)
Lanoil, Brian (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Soil Science
Date accepted
2011-12-21T10:02:09Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Microbial communities are responsible for biogeochemical processes in soils such as nutrient cycling and organic matter formation, which are essential to the establishment of vegetation and ecosystem sustainability. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis, microbial respiration and enzymatic activities were used to assess the development of soil microbial communities in two early ecosystems: along a 99 year glacial chronosequence, and in reconstructed soils in the Canadian boreal forest following open-pit mining. In the glacial environment, microbial biomass, respiration and enzymatic activity increased along the chronosequence and became more similar to the reference stand as vegetation developed. Further, in mid-successional stage soils, microbial biomass in plant rhizospheres was double that measured in bulk soil. In the reconstructed soils the use of organic amendments originating from the target ecosystem placed both the vegetation and soil microbial community on a faster trajectory towards ecosystem recovery than did the use of alternative amendments.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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