ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Young Adult Literature 2.0: Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight and Digital Age Literary PracticesDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R33K8P

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Young Adult Literature 2.0: Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight and Digital Age Literary Practices Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
social networking technology
fan fiction
Canadian
Internet
Stephenie Meyer
national identity
Web 2.0
young adult literature
Digital Native
Americanization
YA literature
Twilight saga
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Skinner, Leah C. M.
Supervisor and department
Sywenky, Irene (Comparative Literature and Eastern European Studies)
Examining committee member and department
Demers, Patricia (Comparative Literature and English and Film Studies)
Johnston, Ingrid (Secondary Education)
Department
Comparative Literature
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-04-12T15:49:20Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study examines the progress of young adult (YA) literature in the twenty-first century, as influenced by Web 2.0 social networking technology and sliding structural temporalities of age and maturity in these digital times. The context is Stephenie Meyer’s popular Twilight saga, a pioneering example of an author purposefully engaging with online social networking communities and there encouraging derivative creativity, including Twilight fan fiction. This successful integration of YA literature with Web 2.0 is considered by first appraising tensions between traditional theoretical notions of the genre (and its readers) and contemporary manifestations of the same. Second is an investigation of the genre’s evolving readership and textual practices using the Twilight series, focusing on literary activities of Digital Natives (young adults) in online social arenas. A concentration on the integration of national identity into Canadian Twilight fan fiction examines such evolving practices in reference to an American product (a threat of Americanization) being re-coded in a Canadian reader’s personal, public and online spaces.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R33K8P
Rights
License granted by Leah Skinner (leahs@ualberta.ca) on 2011-04-11T15:00:16Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-29T15:47:04.386+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 592984
Last modified: 2015:10:12 20:31:37-06:00
Filename: Skinner_Leah_Spring 2011.pdf
Original checksum: a7ddc6c8b8dccd3656ead0231fe3f30f
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Microsoft Word - Skinner_Leah_Spring 2011.doc
File author: Leah Skinner
Page count: 134
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date