ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Teacher Practices in Science Literacy Instruction for Learners who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in KenyaDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31688

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Teacher Practices in Science Literacy Instruction for Learners who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in Kenya Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Deaf/HH
Practices
Science
Teacher
Kenya
Literacy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Namukoa, Abraham W
Supervisor and department
Dr. McQuarrie, Lynn (Education Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Nocente Norma (Secondary Education)
Dr.Rauno Parrila (Education Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Special Education
Date accepted
2014-07-22T10:06:53Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The Kenyan Vision 2030 initiative, which aims at improving the quality of life for all citizens, has put increasing emphasis on science literacy (Amunga, Amadalo, & Musera, 2011). Even though the Kenyan secondary school curriculum is designed to accomplish the goals of the Vision 2030 initiative, learners who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) score significantly below average in all required science subjects (i.e., biology, chemistry, and physics) on their Kenya Certificate of Secondary School Examination (KCSE). With the implementation of the Kenyan Vision 2030 initiative, and in light of the trailing achievement of D/HH learners in science subjects, it is paramount to explore and identify teaching practices in science education for these learners. This study employed a descriptive survey design to explore Kenyan teachers’ practices in science literacy instruction for D/HH learners, their perceptions on the effectiveness of the best practices identified in the literature, barriers to implementation, and recommendations that should be considered in efforts to improve science literacy instruction for D/HH learners in Kenya. A convenience sample of 26 science teachers participated in an online survey. Fifteen teachers also participated in in-depth focus group interviews. The results revealed that, Kenyan science teachers are aware of the cited best practices and strategies in science literacy instruction for D/HH learners, but these practices and strategies are often implemented only superficially in their classrooms.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31688
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2015-01-08T08:00:16.449+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (PDF/A)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 2347936
Last modified: 2015:10:12 12:03:26-06:00
Filename: Namukoa_Abraham_W_201407_MEd.pdf
Original checksum: d6d2a7888f139a670b09b5745333040e
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Microsoft Word - Namukoa_Abraham_W_201407_MEd.docx
Page count: 125
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date