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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3533K

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Tse Keh Nay-European Relations and Ethnicity: 1790s-2009 Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Ingenika
John Stuart
Ethnicity
Kwadacha
Daniel William Harmon
Alexander MacKenzie
Beaver
Bear Lake
Indian Reserve Commission
McLeod Lake Adhesion
Sekani
Fort Grahame
Fort Ware
Fort Connelly
Adrien Gabriel Morice
Takla Lake
Simon Fraser
McLeod Lake
Finlay Forks
Archibald McDonald
History
Tse Keh Nay
British Columbia Land Claims
Dunneza
Samuel Black
BC Treaty Process
Tsay Keh Dene
Treaty No. 8
McKenna-McBride Royal Commission
Fort Nelson
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Sims, Daniel
Supervisor and department
Ens, Gerhard (History and Classics)
Examining committee member and department
Andersen, Christian (Native Studies)
Irwin, Robert (History and Classics)
Mills, David (History and Classics)
Department
Department of History and Classics
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-12-02T22:42:40Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis examines Tse Keh Nay (Sekani) ethnic identity over three periods of Aboriginal-European relations: the fur trade period, the missionary period, and the treaty and reserve period. It examines the affects these three periods have had on the Tse Keh Nay as an ethnic group in four chapters, the first two dealing with the fur trade and missionary periods, and the last two with the treaty and reserve aspects of the treaty and reserve period. In it I argue that during the first two periods wider Tse Keh Nay ethnic identity was reinforced, while during the latter period local Tse Keh Nay identities were reinforced through government policies that dealt with Tse Keh Nay subgroups on a regional and localized basis. Despite this shift in emphasis, wider Tse Keh Nay ethnic identity has remained, proving that Tse Keh Nay ethnic identity is both situational and dynamic.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3533K
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 4786933
Last modified: 2015:10:12 19:15:49-06:00
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File title: Introduction
File author: Daniel Sims
Page count: 191
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