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Using two- and three-dimensional kinematic analysis to compare functional outcomes in patients who have undergone facial reanimation surgery Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
kinematic analysis
two-dimensional
facial reanimation surgery
three-dimensional
facial motion
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Dunwald, Lisa
Supervisor and department
Carol Boliek, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Jana Rieger, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Examining committee member and department
Carol Boliek, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Jana Rieger, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Jonathan Norton, Surgery
Department
Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-12T21:34:26Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The current study was designed to: (1) compare the sensitivity of a 2-dimensional video-based system with a 3-dimensional optical system, and (2) investigate movement on the affected and unaffected side of the face during the production of various functional movement tasks in 5 patients who had undergone facial reanimation surgery. The study showed that: (1) distance is the most valuable measure for evaluating facial paralysis, regardless of system; (2) movements associated with maximal contraction and running speech tasks are most informative when assessing facial paralysis; (3) area and volume ratios may be an appropriate measure for tracking changes in facial movement over time; (4) velocity and acceleration measures provide minimal information regarding facial movement; and (5) 2-dimensional analysis is most effective when distance is measured during maximal contraction and running speech tasks. Both systems were effective in tracking small movements of the face, but the 3-dimensional system was superior overall.
Language
English
Rights
License granted by Lisa Dunwald (lisa@dunwald.ca) on 2010-08-10T07:00:50Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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