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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3DJ58R05

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Theses and Dissertations

Correlations in morphology between the sexes in feather mites (Acari: Astigmata): precopulatory guarding and reproductive morphologies Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
evolution
correlated morphologies
feather mites
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Byers, Kaylee A.
Supervisor and department
Proctor, Heather (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Palmer, Rich (Biological Sciences)
Heming, Bruce (Biological Sciences)
Hall, Jocelyn (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Systematics and Evolution
Date accepted
2013-06-27T14:12:56Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Sexual dimorphism is prominent across animals. In addition to differences in size and colouration, the sexes may also differ in non-genitalic contact traits whereby the grasping morphologies of males are matched by either cooperative or resistant corresponding structures in females. Resistance traits may also be genitalic and are indicative of sexually antagonistic coevolution whereby the sexes adapt and counter-adapt traits to maximize their own fitness. For both hypotheses of cooperative and antagonistic coevolution, theory predicts a correlation in the dimensions of male and female structures. I aim to determine whether correlated morphologies between the sexes in the Proctophyllodidae and Trouessartiidae are cooperative or antagonistic. Furthermore, I evaluate whether directional trends exist in the evolution of gentialic size in the genus Trouessartia. My studies indicate that feather mites are exceptions to many trends, and due to their diversity are excellent organisms for further study in regards to sexual selection.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3DJ58R05
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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