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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3043C

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Understanding Attrition in Pediatric Weight Management Care Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
case study
clinic
qualitative
drop out
pediatric
weight management
attrition
integrative review
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Dhaliwal, Jasmine
Supervisor and department
Ball, Geoff DC (Pediatrics)
Examining committee member and department
Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie (Pediatrics)
Holt, Nicholas L (Physical Education and Recreation)
Department
Medical Sciences-Paediatrics
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-09-24T14:37:50Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
There is limited information on families’ decisions regarding their (dis)continuation of weight management care. This thesis includes two complementary studies that examined this issue. First, an integrative review was performed to characterize predictors of and reasons for attrition in pediatric weight management. Analyses revealed that insurance type was a consistent predictor of attrition, whereas children’s sex and baseline weight status were not. The most commonly reported reasons for attrition were physical barriers and programs failing to meet families’ needs, wants, or expectations. Second, a qualitative study was conducted with families to explore factors that influenced their attrition from pediatric weight management. Three main categories relating to attrition were identified: family, logistical, and health services factors. Together, this research demonstrated that attrition is a highly prevalent issue that needs to be addressed at multiple levels to optimize health services delivery for managing pediatric obesity.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3043C
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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