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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3R20S364

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Environmental Exposures, Gut Microbiota, and Urinary Metabolomic Fingerprint of Crohn’s Disease Patients Who Have Undergone Ileo-colonic Resection Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
ileocolonic resection
surgery
postoperative recurrence
Crohn's disease
environmental exposures
microbiota
metabolomics
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Tso, Robert
Supervisor and department
Greiner, Russ (Computer Science)
Madsen, Karen (Medicine)
Fedorak, Richard (Medicine)
Examining committee member and department
Willing, Ben (Agriculture)
Department
Department of Medicine
Specialization
Experimental Medicine
Date accepted
2014-01-03T13:48:44Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an idiopathic disease that causes intestinal inflammation and lesions. Canada has one of the highest rates of IBD in the world. One of the major types of IBD is Crohn’s Disease (CD) and a large portion of CD patients will undergo surgical resection in the course of their disease. However, up to 90% of these patients will have endoscopic recurrence by 5 years post-surgery. The cause of the recurrence is unknown, but is thought to follow the same course as the initial onset of Crohn’s lesions. In this study CD patients in endoscopic remission and relapse that have undergone ileocolonic resection were compared. Results show there were specific changes in gut microbial composition, variations in urinary metabolites and unique environmental exposures, both current and childhood, between the remission and relapse patients.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3R20S364
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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