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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3W95X

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Let’s not Sugar-Coat it: Exploring Differences of Sugar Consumption Behaviours During Pregnancy Through Focused Ethnography Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Qualitative Research
Nutrition
Pregnancy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Graham, Jocelyn E.
Supervisor and department
Bell, Rhonda (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Examining committee member and department
McCargar, Linda (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Mayan, Maria (Faculty of Extension)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-06-20T11:44:24Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Excessive sugar consumption may adversely affect maternal and fetal health. This study explored influences on women’s sugar consumption behaviours during pregnancy using focused ethnography. Fifteen pregnant women were interviewed and qualitative content analysis was used to inductively derive themes. Pregnant women increased their intake of sugars in an effort to achieve a compromise between meeting nutrition recommendations, lifestyle adjustments, physical symptoms, and cultural norms. Some women maintained their sugar intake compared to non-pregnancy as part of their dietary routine. Women who lowered their sugar intake had made a conscious decision and were motivated by personal and fetal health. Physical symptoms, lack of nutritional guidance, and social pressures were identified as barriers to achieving a diet low in sugars, while implementing dietary strategies guided by nutritional knowledge was a facilitator. This research provides important insights that may be used to design effective interventions to improve maternal health.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3W95X
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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