ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Symptom expectation and attribution in whiplash-associated disordersDownload the full-sized PDF

Actions

Download  |  Analytics

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Symptom expectation and attribution in whiplash-associated disorders Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
whiplash injury
neck injury
whiplash-associated disorders
attribution
recovery
traffic collisions
pain
beliefs
outcomes
expectations
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Ferrari, Robert
Supervisor and department
Russell, Anthony S. (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
Davis, Paul (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
McAlister, Finlay (Department of Medicine)
Carroll, Linda J. (Public Health Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Carroll, Linda J. (Public Health Sciences)
Russell, Anthony S. (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
Davis, Paul (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
Homik, Joanne (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
McAlister, Finlay (Department of Medicine)
Department
Department of Medicine
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-07-06T20:27:44Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Introduction: Little is known about the effect of beliefs on whiplash-associated disorders. Objective: To assess population beliefs regarding whiplash injury, to assess expectation as a predictor of recovery; to explore symptom attribution (Study III); and, assess the relationship between the Whiplash Disability Questionnaire (WDQ) and self-assessed recovery. Materials and Methods: Canadian residents were surveyed about whiplash injury; a whiplash cohort was assessed for association between expectations of recovery and recovery; whiplash patients were examined to correlate auditory symptoms and cerumen occlusion; and, Whiplash patients were asked a global recovery question and results compared to the whiplash Disability Questionnaire (WDQ). Results: Beliefs about whiplash injury were more negative. Expectations of recovery from injury increases the recovery rate. Cerumen explains auditory symptoms in whiplash patients. Patients responding β€˜yes’ to the recovery question had a low WDQ score. Conclusions: Population beliefs, expectations of recovery and symptom attribution are important in whiplash-associated disorders.
Language
English
Rights
License granted by Robert Ferrari (rferrari@shaw.ca) on 2010-06-30T03:31:20Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T01:55:18.128+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 18021812
Last modified: 2015:10:12 13:04:00-06:00
Filename: Masters Thesis Jun 29-10.pdf
Original checksum: 3a0866a36cd4f19fdaafec2e25f37660
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Microsoft Word - Masters Thesis Jun 29-10.doc
File author: Robert Ferrari
Page count: 61
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date