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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30H7P

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Residential Mobility in the Rural Greek Past: A Strontium Isotope Investigation Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Strontium
Greece
Isotope
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Leslie, Brian G
Supervisor and department
Garvie-Lok, Sandra (Anthropology)
Examining committee member and department
Palmer, Andie (Anthropology)
Garvie-Lok, Sandra (Anthropology)
Hijmans, Steven (History and Classics)
Willoughby, Pamela (Anthropology)
Department
Department of Anthropology
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-08-23T12:46:51Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Excavations conducted at the ancient city of Stymphalos and the monastery of Zaraka in the valley of Stymphalos, Greece, yielded a number of human graves. Neither group of burials was contemporaneous with the structures in which they were interred and they are believed to represent small farming populations dating to the Late Roman/Early Byzantine (4-6th c. AD) and Late Medieval periods (14-15th c. AD). A dietary reconstruction conducted by Pennycock (2008) found that most individuals had similar δ¹³C and δ¹5N values, but a few had values that indicate dietary differences. Pennycook suggested that perhaps these differences were the result of residential mobility. For this thesis, tooth enamel was analyzed for strontium isotopes to investigate mobility. The 87Sr/86Sr values show substantial movement by some human inhabitants of the valley, and may also be indicative of animal transport. These results suggest that rural peasants may have been more mobile than previously expected.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30H7P
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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