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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3SM06

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An Autonomy Support Motivation Intervention with Pre-Service Teachers: Do the Strategies that They Intend to Use Change? Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Self-Determination Theory
Autonomy Support
Preservice Teachers
Teacher Education
Motivation Strategies
Intervention
Motivation
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Radil, Amanda I.
Supervisor and department
Daniels, Lia (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Klassen, Robert (Educational Psychology)
Foster, Rosemary (Educational Policy Studies)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Psychological Studies in Education
Date accepted
2012-06-22T14:22:44Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Self-Determination Theory posits that autonomy is one of three psychological needs whose fulfillment leads to an optimally motivating learning environment. A quasi-experimental design was used to see if the motivational strategies that preservice teachers intended to use in their classrooms changed after they were presented with an evidence-based autonomy-support motivation intervention. A mixed randomized-repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the strategies change significantly in comparison to a control group, with both a main effect of time (F (1,60) = 13.84, p > .001) and a significant interaction effect (F (1,60) = 8.07, p = .01). Analysis revealed that preservice teachers in both groups endorsed autonomy-supportive motivational strategies at similar levels before the intervention; those who took part in the intervention endorsed significantly more autonomy-supportive strategies after the intervention than the control group. The effects of novelty and usefulness of content were explored. Implications, suggestions for further research and future applications are discussed.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3SM06
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 1819631
Last modified: 2015:10:12 11:13:02-06:00
Filename: Radil_Amanda_Fall 2012.pdf
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File title: Historically, a vast amount of research has been conducted with student populations around the idea of intrinsic motivation (Niemiec & Ryan, 2009)
File author: Amanda Radil
Page count: 96
File language: en-US
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