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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3NK36C05

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Postbreeding movement patterns and multiscale habitat use of adult wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) at urban wetlands of Edmonton, Alberta. Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
habitat use
wood frog
movement
urban
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Taylor,Murdoch,ED
Supervisor and department
Eaton, Brian (Alberta Innovates)
Paszkowski, Cynthia (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Bayne, Erin (Biological Sciences)
Vinebrooke, Rolf (Biological Sciences)
McKenzie, Derek (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2013-10-17T14:59:07Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Many studies have focused on the effects of urbanization on amphibian species richness, abundance and diversity, but few studies have quantified the effect on amphibian movement behaviour or habitat use. At 11 urban wetlands in Edmonton, Alberta, I examined the postbreeding movement behaviour and habitat use of adult wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) from April through October using radio telemetry. I found that movement from breeding wetlands was limited, with most tracked individuals remaining within 25 m of ponds in grassy riparian zones. Long-distance migratory movements were rare and only occurred at sites with a high proportion of forested land-cover surrounding the wetland. Tracked frogs showed a preference at three spatial scales for habitat close to water that provided shelter from desiccation and predation (e.g. unmowed grass and stands of shrubs). These findings have implications for the management of wetlands and conservation of amphibian populations in urban settings.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3NK36C05
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File title: University of Alberta
File author: Murdoch Taylor
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