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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31J97G7N

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Metallic Flame-Sprayed Coatings as Anti-Icing and De-Icing Systems for Wind Turbines Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Flame Spray
Ice accretion
Joule Heating
Anti-Icing
Wind Turbines
De-icing
Thermal Spray
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lopera, Adrian
Supervisor and department
McDonald, Andre (Department of Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Elias, Anastasia (Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering)
McDonald, Andre (Department of Mechanical Engineering)
Kumar, Aloke (Department of Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-09-04T09:04:35Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Ice accretion is a problem that affects the performance and safety of structures that are exposed to cold weather environments. In wind energy production, a constantly growing industry, ice accretion has been found to decrease the performance, produce mechanical failures, and decrease the safety of wind turbines in cold climates. The development of methods to decrease and mitigate the effects of ice accretion in the performance, longevity, and safety of wind turbines has been the main objective of many studies. In this thesis, flame-sprayed nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) and nickel-chromium (NiCr) coatings were deposited on fiber-reinforced polymer composites (FRPC). Electrical current was applied to the coatings to increase the surface temperature by way of Joule heating. The performance of the coatings as heating elements was tested under different cold environment conditions. In addition, heat transfer models were developed to predict the heating and melting times of ice during the de-icing process. It was found that the coatings were effective heating elements for melting accumulated ice on polymer composite structures that were exposed to cold environments. The results of a finite length-scale model and its agreement with experimental data suggest that a heat conduction model may be applied to free boundary problems to predict phase change phenomena induced by thermal-sprayed coatings
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31J97G7N
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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