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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3MS3K14X

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A longitudinal and cross-sectional examination of the relationship between reasons for choosing a neighbourhood, physical activity and body mass index Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Berry, T. R.
Spence, J. C.
Blanchard, C.
Cutumisu, N.
Edwards, J.
Selfridge, G.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Design
Risk
Walkability
Obesity
Weight change
Overweight
Mortality
Built environment
Association
Behaviors
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
Abstract: Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between body mass index and neighborhood walkability, socioeconomic status (SES), reasons for choosing neighborhoods, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, and demographic variables. Methods: Two studies, one longitudinal and one cross-sectional, were conducted. Participants included adults (n = 572) who provided complete data in 2002 and 2008 and a concurrent sample from 2008 (n = 1164). Data were collected with longitudinal and cross-sectional telephone surveys. Objective measures of neighborhood characteristics (walkability and SES) were calculated using census data and geographic information. Results: In the longitudinal study, neighborhood choice for ease of walking and proximity to outdoor recreation interacted with whether participants had moved during the course of study to predict change in BMI over 6 years. Age, change in activity status, and neighborhood SES were also significant predictors of BMI change. Cross-sectionally, neighborhood SES and neighborhood choice for ease of walking were significantly related to BMI as were gender, age, activity level and fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusions: Results demonstrate that placing importance on choosing neighborhoods that are considered to be easily walkable is an important contributor to body weight. Findings that objectively measured neighbourhood SES and neighborhood choice variables contributed to BMI suggest that future research consider the role of neighborhood choice in examining the relationships between the built environment and body weight.
Date created
2010
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3MS3K14X
License information
Rights
© 2010 Berry, Spence, Blanchard, Cutumisu, Edwards, and Selfridge; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation for previous publication
Berry, T. R., Spence, J. C., Blanchard, C., Cutumisu, N., Edwards, J., & Selfridge, G. (2010). A longitudinal and cross-sectional examination of the relationship between reasons for choosing a neighbourhood, physical activity and body mass index. International Journal of the Behaviour of Nutrition and Physical Activity, 7, 57-68. doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-7-57.
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File title: A longitudinal and cross-sectional examination of the relationship between reasons for choosing a neighbourhood, physical activity and body mass index
File author: Tanya R Berry, John C Spence, Chris M Blanchard, Nicoleta Cutumisu, Joy Edwards, Genevieve Selfridge
Page count: 11
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