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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3K07S

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Activation of Delayed and Fluid Petroleum Coke for the Adsorption and Removal of Naphthenic Acids from Oil Sands Tailings Pond Water Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
activation
adsorption
naphthenic acids
petroleum coke
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Small, Christina
Supervisor and department
Dr. Ania Ulrich (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Dr. Zaher Hashisho (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Zaher Hashisho (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Dr. Selma Guigard (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Dr. Natalia Semagina (Chemical and Materials Engineering)
Department
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-12-22T19:42:28Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Oil sands companies produce substantial quantities of tailings known to contain high concentrations of dissolved organic by-products. The use of petroleum coke was proposed as a potential adsorbent for organic contaminant removal from tailings pond water. Physical activation was used to create a greater surface area and porosity within the delayed and fluid coke. Increased temperature (900oC), steam rate (0.5 mL/min), and activated time (6 h) led to high iodine numbers of 670 and 620 mg/g for activated delayed and fluid cokes, respectively. For both best activated cokes, the micropore to mesopore ratio was approximately 50:50. When 5 g/L of activated delayed and fluid cokes were added to the tailings water, 91% of the dissolved organic carbon and 92% of the naphthenic acids were removed. Such analyses indicate that an oil sands waste by-product can be used to treat tailings pond water to remove toxic and corrosive organic contaminants.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3K07S
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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2014-04-30T22:29:03.050+00:00
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 15586887
Last modified: 2015:10:12 12:44:50-06:00
Filename: Small_Christina_Spring 2011.pdf
Original checksum: 0b0aede86e3dc8af7b50369eb4f886d3
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File title: Microsoft Word - CS_THESIS_Final
File author: Christina Small
Page count: 169
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