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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3WT6G

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Impact of a low fructose, low glycemic index and low glycemic load dietary intervention on liver function, body composition and cardio metabolic risk factors in children and adolescents with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
pediatric
liver disease
Nutrition
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Rivera, Ingrid
Supervisor and department
Mager, Diana (Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Examining committee member and department
Bell, Rhonda (Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Yap, Jason (Department of Pediatrics)
Mager, Diana (Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization
Nutrition and Metabolism
Date accepted
2013-04-02T15:31:38Z
Graduation date
2013-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease in obese children. Diets high in added fructose (high fructose corn syrup; HFCS)/glycemic index (GI)/glycemic load (GL) in children with NAFLD are associated with increased inflammation and liver dysfunction. We hypothesized that a low GI/GL/fructose diet over six months would result in improvements in body composition, insulin resistance (IR), liver function and metabolic parameters in childhood NAFLD. Children with NAFLD and healthy children were studied at baseline (n=12 NAFLD, n=14 controls), 3-and-6 months (n=7 NAFLD; n=13 controls). Significant reductions in systolic blood pressure, body-fat percentage, plasma free fatty acids, Apo-B-100, HOMA-IR and ALT were observed in children with NAFLD at three-months (p<0.05). The strongest relationships between intake with HOMA-IR and plasma ALT were observed when children with NAFLD reduced their intake of GI (p=0.009), GL (p<0.001), total fructose (p=0.001), and HFCS (p=0.004). Treatment strategies aimed at reducing in fructose/GI/GL may contribute to therapy in childhood NAFLD.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3WT6G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: University of Alberta
File author: Ingrid Rivera I��iguez
File author: Ingrid Rivera I??iguez
File author: Ingrid Rivera Iiguez
Page count: 249
File language: en-CA
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