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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3M073

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Plastic phenotypic responses of the sea star Pisaster ochraceus to spatial and temporal variation in wave exposure Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
tube feet
PIT tagging
phenotypic plasticity
intertidal
neutral red
echinoderm
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Hayne, Kurtis
Supervisor and department
Palmer, A. Richard (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Leys, Sally (Biological Sciences)
Leighton, Lindsey (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-29T04:17:44Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The intertidal sea star Pisaster ochraceus lives in a wide range of wave-exposure conditions in the northeastern Pacific. Its body form and tube foot tenacity are both highly correlated with wave exposure. On wave-exposed shores sea stars attach to the substrate with higher tenacity, weigh significantly less per unit arm length, and have a narrower body and arms. Water velocity explained over 99% of the variation in average body shape and 92% of the variation in average tenacity. Reciprocal transplants revealed that both traits responded plastically to changes in wave exposure, so the variation is therefore primarily ecophenotypic. This plasticity is likely also adaptive, allowing Pisaster to respond to variation in flow in both space and time. Both phenotypic responses probably act to reduce dislodgement risk – changes in tenacity influence attachment force and changes in body form modify the drag and lift experienced, which are the main effectors of dislodgement.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3M073
Rights
License granted by Kurtis Hayne (khayne@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-28T02:40:17Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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