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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R35X25K5K

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Revegetation of Fen Peatlands Following Oil and Gas Extraction in Northern Alberta Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Peatlands
Revegetation
Fen
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Shunina,Anna
Supervisor and department
Bork,Edward
Examining committee member and department
Foote,Lee (Renewable Resources)
Osko,Terry (Circle T Consulting, Inc.)
Bork,Edward (Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science)
Naeth,Anne (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization
Rangeland and Wildlife Resources
Date accepted
2015-01-26T15:50:55Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
A field experiment from 2012 to 2013 at two locations in northeastern Alberta examined the short-term success of different fen revegetation strategies following the removal of infrastructure (road and well-pad) associated with oil extraction. Although all treatments resulted in limited overall success in achieving revegetation relative to the adjacent intact fens, transplanting with sedge and cotton grass was more effective than that of other treatments. While composted (dead) peat had little to no effect on revegetation, live peat modified the plant community slightly, as did a rough surface treatment. Transplants of woody species were more successful at the top and middle micro-topographic positions on the well-pad, and generally enhanced species richness and diversity. Water availability was important in regulating species recovery at all locations. After two years all treatments remain highly dissimilar to that of the adjacent undisturbed fens.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R35X25K5K
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Fen revegetation is widely recognized as a key component of the management of disturbed peatlands.

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