ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Natural variation and short-term impact of aspen harvesting on surface stream chemistry in the Boreal PlainsDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3P939

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Natural variation and short-term impact of aspen harvesting on surface stream chemistry in the Boreal Plains Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
chemical export
Boreal Plains
harvesting
natural variation
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Palmer, Amy R
Supervisor and department
Devito, Kevin (Biological Sciences)
Vinebrooke, Rolf (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
St. Louis, Vincent (Biological Sciences)
Silins, Uldis (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-01-28T18:12:45Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis describes the natural variation and influence of aspen harvesting on stream chemical concentration and flow-weighted export from catchments typical of the Western Boreal Plain, Alberta, Canada. The catchment stream discharge and stream chemical concentrations presented are taken from a subset of a five-year paired catchment (2005-2010) HEAD2 NSERC-CRD study. Nutrients, major anions, major cations and two minor ions were monitored from second-order streams draining a 18.3 sq km reference catchment (R1) and compared to a 9.9 sq km experimental catchment (H1) for two years of pre-harvesting (2005-2006) and two years of sequential harvesting (2007-2008). Preliminary analyses showed that non-harvest high flows had a total average instantaneous export greater than 10 times that of low flows. In addition, summer storms and beaver dam breakages had stream export equivalent to or greater than spring melt. Intensive upland aspen harvesting showed no significant differences in major cation and anion export post-harvest with the exception of increased sulfate.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3P939
Rights
License granted by Amy Palmer (amyrpalmer@gmail.com) on 2011-01-28T17:34:51Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-30T23:15:40.991+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 2998937
Last modified: 2015:10:12 13:15:59-06:00
Filename: Palmer_Amy_Spring 2011.pdf
Original checksum: f78244d1b821e500d6257e38c21c6dd9
Well formed: true
Valid: true
Page count: 119
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date