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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3094G

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Metaphor and Ecocriticism in Jon Krakauer’s Mountaineering Texts Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
John Krakauer
Eiger Dreams
Ecocriticism
Metaphor
Into Thin Air
Into the Wild
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Jewett, Alicia A
Supervisor and department
Jonathan Hart, (English and Film Studies)
Examining committee member and department
Irene Sywenky (Comparative Literature)
Marg Iveson (Secondary Education)
Jonathan Hart, (English and Film Studies)
Department
Comparative Literature
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-07-24T12:22:29Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study examines Jon Krakauer’s three mountaineering texts, Eiger Dreams, Into the Wild, and Into Thin Air, from an ecocritical perspective for the purpose of implicating literature as a catalyst of change for the current environmental crisis. Language, as a means of understanding reality, is responsible for creating and reinforcing ethical ways of understanding our relationship with nature. Krakauer’s texts demonstrate the dangers of using metaphor to conceive nature by reconstructing the events of Chris McCandless’ journey to Alaska, his own experience climbing The Devil’s Thumb, and the 1996 disaster that occurred during his summit of Mount Everest. By acknowledging that metaphors, which include nature as a refuge, object, and antagonist, Krakauer also speaks to the Western habit of conceptualization through binaries. This study aims to highlight Krakauer’s method of dismantling these environmentally unethical metaphors, and subsequently the Western binaries that support them, through the use of metacognitive reflection, writing, and diction.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3094G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Alicia Jewett Master's Thesis
File title: Alicia Jewett Master's Thesis
File author: Alicia LeBleu
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