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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3V612

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Autonomy-support and control: observed mother-father differences and parents' contributions to preschool social-emotional competence Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
mothers and fathers
preschoolers
social-emotional competence
parenting behaviours
Autonomy support and control
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Gordon, Jennifer
Supervisor and department
Dr. Christina Rinaldi (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Jacqueline Pei (Educational Psychology)
Dr. Lynn McGarvey (Elementary Education)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-09-25T14:57:28Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
In a sample of 57 two-parent families, the current study investigated: (a) mother-father differences in observed autonomy supportive and control behaviours (i.e., directives and negative, parent-centered control); and (b) mothers’ and fathers’ unique and relative contributions to children’s later social-emotional competence. Parents’ behaviours were assessed during an observed clean-up task with mother-child and father-child dyads when children were 2 to 3-and-a half years of age. Parent ratings of children’s social-emotional competence were obtained one year later, when children were 3 to 5-and-a-half years old. Results revealed that mothers engaged in significantly more autonomy support than fathers when observed interacting with their young children. Furthermore, mothers’ negative, parent-centered control, and fathers’ autonomy support uniquely predicted children’s later social-emotional competence. These results suggest that mothers and fathers have differential influences on their young children’s growing competences, and exemplify the importance of including fathers in parenting research and intervention.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3V612
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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