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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3J65S

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Making Meaning in Modern Yoga: Methodological Dialogues on Commodification and Contradiction Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
theory
scholar-practitioner
access
service
representation
balance
Commodification
practice
social good
Modern Yoga
health
Post-structuralism
methodology
authenticity
openness
embodiment
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Graham, Laura C
Supervisor and department
Kaler, Amy (Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Heyes, Cressida (Philosophy, Political Science)
Hogeveen, Bryan (Sociology)
Department
Department of Sociology
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-08-31T10:17:04Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study explores the meaning of commodification in modern yoga and finds that commodification often contradicts yoga’s ethical principles. Two different analyses of this phenomenon also produce contradictory accounts. One analysis attempts to understand how practitioners experience commodification, while the other critiques discourse and power relations. Both draw on seven main themes: authenticity, health, openness, balance, service, social good, and access. Practitioners evinced a practice-focus and found commodification positive insofar as it generally supports the themes and increases participation. It was negative, however, when it contradicted them or decreased access. The second analysis argues that through the main themes commodification generally reifies existing power relations, often re-articulates yogic philosophy and practice through western discourses, and can deter people from practicing. The contradictions between the two analyses point toward larger methodological and theoretical issues, however, and can therefore open up a conversation about the always political and partial nature of research.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3J65S
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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