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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VX32

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The roles of temperature and host plant interactions in larval development and population ecology of Parnassius smintheus Doubleday, the Rocky Mountain Apollo butterfly Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
larvae
Lepidoptera
alpine
Sedum
host plant
Parnassius
temperature
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Doyle, Amanda
Supervisor and department
Jens Roland (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Nadir Erbilgin (Agriculture, Life and Environmental Sciences)
Stephen Matter (University of Cincinnati)
J.C. Cahill (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-08-15T18:00:41Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Alpine environments are harsh and unpredictable. Exogenous factors such as weather might therefore be expected to dominate processes affecting population dynamics of alpine organisms, relative to endogenous factors including plant-animal interactions. The alpine butterfly Parnassius smintheus Doubleday is a specialist on Sedum lanceolatum. I examine the importance of interactions between P. smintheus larvae and S. lanceolatum, specifically the potential for an induced defense, indicating that host plant/herbivore interactions may play a significant role in P. smintheus populations. I also examine the effect of temperature (as a component of climate) on the development and survival of P. smintheus caterpillars. Using laboratory and field studies I show that host plant interactions are not important for P. smintheus in the field, and instead moderate changes in temperature are more likely to affect P. smintheus populations. I suggest that any population-level effects of temperature will likely be indirect and mediated through phenological shifts.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3VX32
Rights
License granted by Amanda Doyle (ajdoyle@ualberta.ca) on 2011-08-10T21:57:48Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File author: Amanda Doyle
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