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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3MK65H49

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Influence of Soil Capping Depth on Water Dynamics in Phosphogypsum Stack Reclamation Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Water Balance
Soil Depth
Phosphogypsum
Capping Depth
Percolation
TDR
Reclamation
PG Stack
ET Cover System
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Christensen, Andre Forrest
Supervisor and department
Chanasyk, David (Renewable Resources)
Dyck, Miles (Renewable Resources)
Naeth, Anne (Renewable Resources)
Nichol, Connie (Agrium Inc.)
Examining committee member and department
Naeth, Anne (Renewable Resources)
Hernandez-Ramirez, Guillermo (Renewable Resources)
Chanasyk, Anne (Renewable Resources)
Nichol, Connie (Agrium Inc.)
Dyck, Miles (Renewable Resources
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Soil Science
Date accepted
2013-09-28T13:33:26Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The influence of capping soil depth on water dynamics was investigated at a decommissioned phosphogypsum (PG) stack in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. PG is the a by-product in phosphoric acid production, a necessary component of phosphorus fertilizer. Currently, there are no environmental regulations governing the depth of capping soil required for PG stack reclamation. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR), MPS-1 matric potential sensors and conservative tracer application were used to assess water balance across capping soil depths. Results from the varying experiments indicated that an increase in capping soil depth contributed to greater infiltration of spring snowmelt water resulting in deeper penetration of the advective water front into the reclaimed system. Percolation estimates for capping soil depths < 46 cm were <3% of annual precipitation; however, the temporal variation in downward flux estimates suggest spring snowmelt is the dominant event contributing to percolation.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3MK65H49
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Christensen, A . F., He, H., Dyck, M. F., Turner, L., Chanasyk, D. S., Naeth, M. A. and Nichol, C. 2013. In situ measurements of snowmelt infiltration under various topsoil cap thicknesses on a reclaimed site. Can. J. Soil Sci. 93:497-510.

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