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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3G39N

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The Effects of Cranial Cooling During Uncompensable Heat Stress in Fire Protective Ensemble Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Encapsulated
Thermal Regulation
Heat stress
Cranial
Protective Clothing
Cooling
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Scarlett, Michael Philip Brown
Supervisor and department
Dr. Stewart Petersen, University of Alberta, Faculty of physical Education and Recreation
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Michael Stickland, University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine
Dr. Dan Syrotuik, University of Alberta, Faculty of physical Education and Recreation
Dr. Stephen Cheung, Brock University, Faculty of Kinesology
Dr. Stewart Petersen, University of Alberta, Faculty of physical Education and Recreation
Department
Physical Education and Recreation
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-12-20T09:05:29Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This experiment investigated the physiological effects of cranial cooling during recovery from fully-encapsulated exercise with fire protective ensemble. On two separate days, twelve males completed 2x20 minutes of treadmill exercise (EX1 and EX2) at 65 ± 4 % of VO2peak, each followed by 20 minutes of encapsulated recovery (R1 and R2). During recovery, either active (AC: hood perfused with 10°C water) or passive (PC: head exposed to ambient conditions) conditions were randomly assigned. Core temperature (Tc) increased significantly and by a similar amount from rest to the end of EX2 in both conditions. Both AC and PC conditions led to a similar decrease in core temperature during R1. However, a significant interaction between conditions occurred during R2 (p = 0.035) which suggests that AC was more effective than PC at the end of the protocol when core temperature was highest. Despite decreases in Tc during recovery, heat storage was cumulative.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3G39N
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Scarlett, M.P., Cheung, S.S., Stickland, M.K., Petersen, S.R. 2013. The effects of cranial cooling during uncompensable heat stress in fire protective ensemble. Appl. Physiol. Nutr. Metab. 38. 1076.

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