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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3HQ61

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Investigating the effects of transportation infrastructure development on energy consumption and emissions Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
transportation
emissions modeling
fuel consumption
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Achtymichuk, Darren S.
Supervisor and department
Checkel, M.D. (Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Kumar, Amit (Mechanical Engineering)
Qiu, Tony (Civil Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-09T17:16:14Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study outlines the development of an emissions modeling process in which tractive power based emissions functions are applied to microscopic traffic simulation data. The model enables transportation planners to evaluate the effects of transportation infrastructure projects on emissions and fuel consumption to aid in selecting the projects providing the greatest environmental return on investment. Using the developed model, the performance of a set of simplified macroscopic velocity profiles used in an existing emissions model has been evaluated. The profiles were found to under predict the vehicle emissions due to the low acceleration rates used. To illustrate the use of the model in evaluating transportation infrastructure projects, the benefits of two potential development scenarios in a major transportation corridor were evaluated. Weighing the benefits provided by each scenario against their associated costs revealed that greenhouse gas emissions would be reduced at a cost an order of magnitude greater than the value of a carbon credit suggesting that neither option is economical solely as a greenhouse gas emissions reduction tool.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3HQ61
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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