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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3WD3Q90X

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Theses and Dissertations

Preventing Atrocity Crimes in Myanmar: A Case Study in the Responsibility to Protect Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Burma
Myanmar
responsibility to protect
atrocity crimes
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Phung, Hao T
Supervisor and department
Knight, W. Andy (Political Science)
Examining committee member and department
Keating, Tom (Political Science)
Harrington, Joanna (Law)
Department
Department of Political Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-08-29T13:28:25Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The responsibility to protect is a norm which advances the idea that sovereignty is not just a right but also a responsibility, one derived from a state’s commitment to protect its populations from four core crimes. In this thesis I ask whether the norm is applicable to the protracted civil war in Myanmar. Although the human rights violations committed in the civil war can be considered war crimes or crimes against humanity, they have occurred at such low intensity that they do not trigger R2P if the norm is understood as a rallying cry to extinguish large-scale crimes. However, if understood as an enduring political agreement, an R2P approach would focus on capacity-building of the Myanmar government and the international community to prevent atrocity crimes from occurring in the first place. The success of R2P will depend largely on the political will of the leaders in Myanmar, ASEAN, and China.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3WD3Q90X
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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