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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31921

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Talent Identification and Carding in Canadian Track and Field: Is Our System Empirically Supported? Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Sport
Talent Identification
Athlete funding
Sport Science
Athletics Canada
Carding
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Rosenke, Daniel
Supervisor and department
Denison, Jim (Physical Education and Recreation)
Examining committee member and department
Baudin, Pierre (Physical Education and Recreation)
Strean, Billy (Physical Education and Recreation)
Department
Physical Education and Recreation
Specialization

Date accepted
2014-11-13T09:15:36Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The body of sport-science literature on talent identification (TI) suggests it to be a multi-factoral process aimed at targeting athletes with the potential for success in sport. The aim of this study is to provide a detailed examination of Athletics Canada’s (AC) Athlete Assistance Program (AAP) policy, and the degree to which they incorporate TI literature into their practices. The second aspect of this study will give a detailed appraisal of AC’s adherence to their own policy, and if they in fact, follow their own policy mandates in practice. This study is impactful, as it has the potential to create policy reform with respect to the manner in which AC carries out their funding practices, and the overall effectiveness of their athlete targeting practices.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31921
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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Last modified: 2015:10:22 06:09:01-06:00
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