ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Albertans' preferences for social distance from people with mental illnesses or problemsDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3GD3G

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Albertans' preferences for social distance from people with mental illnesses or problems Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
responsibility
stigma
mental illness
contact
social distance
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Klassen, Amy Lynn
Supervisor and department
Strohschein, Lisa (Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Dyck, Erika (History)
Strain, Laurel (Sociology)
Department
Department of Sociology
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-07-24T19:39:23Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Researchers have noted that the level of contact respondents have with people who have a mental illness and how they attribute responsibility for these conditions contribute to their desire for social distance. Given that the literature suggests that increased contact is associated with reduced social distance and that social distance is highest when individuals are considered personally responsible for their situation, this thesis examines how much of the variation in the desire for social distance is accounted for by both the levels of contact and the attribution of personal responsibility. Ordinary least squares regression was used to analyze the 2007 Alberta Survey (N=1073). Results show that knowing someone, besides oneself, who has received treatment for a mental illness and attributing responsibility for a mental illness onto the individual explain some of the variation in the desire for social distance. The methodological limitations and suggestions for future research are also discussed.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3GD3G
Rights
License granted by Amy Klassen (alk1@ualberta.ca) on 2009-07-24T17:45:33Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T01:42:05.543+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 265273
Last modified: 2015:10:12 12:52:16-06:00
Filename: Klassen_Amy_Fall 2009.pdf
Original checksum: a7201097bdd901868078cfb6243bb3c9
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Invalid object number or object stream offset=259264
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date