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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3GQ26

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Evaluation of Different Winter Road Conditions and Effectiveness of Winter Road Maintenance Operations Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Friction Measurement
Friction
Plowing
Driving Condition
Salting
Friction Coefficient
Sanding
Evaluation of Winter Road Conditions
RT3
Winter Road Maintenance Operations
Winter Road Conditions
Winter Maintenance
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Salimi, Sahar
Supervisor and department
Bayat, Alireza (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Hendry, Michael (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Lu, Ming (Civil and Environmental Engineering
Bayat, Alireza (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Department
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Specialization
Transportation Engineering
Date accepted
2014-06-20T11:32:53Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study uses friction measurements of Real Time Traction Tool (RT3)-Curve to characterize different road conditions, evaluate the effect of winter maintenance operations, and identify influential parameters. The reliability of RT3-Curve device was verified by a speed-dependency analysis. Evaluation of different road conditions showed that ice and snow reduced the dry surface friction considerably and friction decreased as more snow was accumulated. More traffic passes cause ice and moderate-to-heavy snow to become more slippery, while it causes higher friction over light snow. Analysis of winter maintenance operations showed that plowing may not be beneficial for ice, but it is the critical operation for snow. Low sanding did not necessarily improve friction; however, medium and high sanding considerably increased friction over ice and snow. A regression analysis revealed that sand/salt quickly scatters off dry and icy roads due to high-speed traffic; however, salt was immediately effective for snow.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3GQ26
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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