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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QM6V

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Parents' Perception of Professional Contacts During their Adaptation to Caring for a Child with Disabilities Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
children with disabilities
parents' adaptation
parents' perception
professionals support
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Intaprasert, Wanapa
Supervisor and department
Larsen, Denise (Educational Psychology)
Sobsey, Richard (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Georgiou, George (Educational Psychology)
Ray, Lynne (Nursing Faculty)
McConnell, David (Occupational Therapy)
Sobsey, Richard (Educational Psychology)
Ludlow, Barbara (West Virginia University)
Larsen, Denise (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Special Education
Date accepted
2012-03-30T08:52:18Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
Abstract The key objective of this study was to identify and describe parents’ perceptions of professional practices that enhanced or undermined their parental roles and their relationships with their children who have disabilities. In phase one, participants in a focus group were asked to generate responses to the two open-ended questions: (1) “Please describe the important things that professionals have said or done that made you feel better or more secure in your relationship with your child and your role as a parent of a child with a disability”, and (2) “Please describe the important things that professionals have said or done that made you feel worse or less secure in your relationship with your child and your role as a parent of a child with a disability.” Two lists of statements were generated, sorted, and rated by participants. Consequently, multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to analyze the data to create concept maps. The parents’ positive perceptions of professional practices consisted of 5 themes: (1) Supportive services from health professionals, (2) Psychological support from health professionals, (3) Supportive care-workers, (4) Social services help with home-life balance, and (5) Supportive school professionals. The parents’ negative perceptions of professional contacts consisted of 6 themes: (1) Inadequacy of school professionals, (2) Conflict with health professionals, (3) Professionals’ ignorance, (4) Social service professionals’ lack of empathy, (5) Fight for social services, and (6) Funding issues. In phase two, an incidence survey was developed based upon parents’ reported statements. Administering the survey to parents of individuals with disabilities who attended the Elves Special Needs Society programs in Edmonton, Alberta, determined the extent to which other parents perceived similar positive or negative experiences with professional contacts. All 5 clusters from the map on parents’ positive perceptions of professional practices received a significant amount of agreement responses. Respondent variability existed at the level of individual items within “inadequacy of school professionals” and “conflict with health professionals” categories. The findings are important to guide practice for professionals in the field of disabilities services.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3QM6V
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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