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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3R313

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The role of dissent in the creation of Seventh-day Adventist identity Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
religion
cognitive dissonance
Seventh-day Adventist
sects
dissent
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Dunfield, Timothy
Supervisor and department
Kent, Stephen (Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Kent, Stephen (Sociology)
Kitchen, John (Religious Studies)
Brown, Sylvia (English)
Braun, Willi (Religious Studies)
Department
Religious Studies
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-09-23T19:41:57Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis studies the benefits that a religious organization acquires from its identification of, and reaction to, “deviants” within it. If an organization is to continue growing while still maintaining a unique identity, periodically it must have deviant movements within it. Theoretically, I apply insights from sociologists of deviance (particularly Durkheim and Erikson) about the functional benefits of deviance labeling for several aspects of group functioning, such as beliefs and the means of disseminating them, structure and hierarchy, internal policies, and leadership styles. I studied the Seventh-day Adventist organization, applying Festinger’s cognitive dissonance theory to it, in order to better illuminate its history and reaction to dissenters. I focused on three Adventist dissenters; Dudley Canright, John Harvey Kellogg, and the threat posed by Ellet J. Waggoner and Alonzo T. Jones, showing how the organization reinforced its boundaries and maintained control of its members by identifying and punishing these supposed deviants.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3R313
Rights
License granted by Timothy Dunfield (tdunfiel@ualberta.ca) on 2009-09-20T22:51:48Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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