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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3598J

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Tarring the Oil Sands: The Evolution and Emergence of ENGO Opposition in Alberta’s Oil Sands and Social Movement Theory Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Tar Sands
Political Opportunities
Greenpeace
Environmental Organizations
Resource Mobilization
ENGOs
Protest
The Pembina Institute
Alberta Energy
Oil Sands
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Dow, Matthew W.
Supervisor and department
Urquhart, Ian (Political Science)
Examining committee member and department
Patten, Steve (Political Science)
Anderson, Greg (Political Science)
Davidson, Debra (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Department
Department of Political Science
Specialization
Canadian Politics
Date accepted
2012-09-17T10:25:10Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
ABSTRACT: The Alberta oil sands represent tremendous economic growth and prosperity for Alberta and Canada but their development does not come without cost. Environmental Non-Governmental Organizations (ENGOs), specifically the Pembina Institute and Greenpeace, have brought significant attention to the environmental impacts of development. Their history and involvement in the oil sands can be divided into two phases, the first characterized by a collaborative relationship between Pembina Institute and development proponents. The second is characterized by a strategic evolution of the Pembina Institute and the emergence of Greenpeace. Resource Mobilization Theory and Political Opportunity Theory are applied and analyzed to provide an account for the evolution and emergence of ENGOs in Alberta’s oil sands.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3598J
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Dow_Matthew_Fall 2012
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