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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30K7C

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Using Describers to simplify ScriptEase Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
ScriptEase
Describers
User Study
Human Computer Iteraction
Video games
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Desai, Neesha
Supervisor and department
Szafron, Duane (Computing Science)
Examining committee member and department
Carbonaro, Michael, (Educational Psychology)
Bischof, Walter (Computing Science)
Department
Department of Computing Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-09-10T16:48:48Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
A high level of programming knowledge is needed in order to script a video game. This prevents video game design from being accessible to non-programmers. ScriptEase is a tool that was designed to solve this problem. While ScriptEase has been shown to be accessible to 10th grade English students there remains areas for further simplification. This thesis focuses on changing the way authors set options within ScriptEase by introducing a new technique called Describers. Describers allow authors to adapt plain English sentences to provide a description of each option. A user study was conducted that compared Describers against the original technique of using definitions. The participants were able to complete significantly more statements and showed a preference for the Describer. Simplifications such as the Describers will lower the entrance bar for an author. The underlying structure of the Describer can be used to simplify creating conditional statements.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30K7C
Rights
License granted by Neesha Desai (neesha@ualberta.ca) on 2009-09-08T19:26:15Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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