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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3C99S

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Decision-making related to pregnancy and childbirth in Kabarole district, western Uganda Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
childbirth
Uganda
pregnancy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Merchant, Neelam
Supervisor and department
Mumtaz, Zubia (Public Health Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
O'Brien, Beverley (Faculty of Nursing)
Kipp, Walter (Public Health Sciences)
Department
Department of Public Health Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-12-02T19:02:45Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Science in Global Health
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The focus of this study is to understand why, despite high uptake of antenatal care, women in Uganda continue to deliver without skilled birth attendants. A critical gap in our knowledge is an understanding of the decisions women make during pregnancy and childbirth that determine the services they seek. Using a focused ethnography, we explored cultural knowledge and perceptions related to pregnancy and childbirth in Kabarole district. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with women that had recently given birth, their husbands/partners, biomedical and traditional health workers, and older women. HIV was identified as an important reason for seeking antenatal care. Other services used during pregnancy, biomedical and traditional, were accessed based on a complex array of beliefs and advice given to women. Thaddeus and Maine’s Three Delays Model provided a framework for analysis of barriers to skilled attendance at birth, which include distance, support from partners, and quality of health services.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3C99S
Rights
License granted by Neelam Merchant (nmerchan@ualberta.ca) on 2010-11-27T17:52:28Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File size: 1105885
Last modified: 2015:10:12 15:17:10-06:00
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Status message: File header gives version as 1.4, but catalog dictionary gives version as 1.3
File title: Microsoft Word - Neelam Thesis (Oct 15).doc
File author: Neelam Merchant
Page count: 143
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