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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3HD7P16X

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Everyday Wild: How do preserved natural areas in the City of Edmonton contribute to adult perceptions of health and well-being? Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
winter
health promotion
health and well-being
therapeutic landscapes
natural area parks
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Cheesbrough, Alison E
Supervisor and department
Nykiforuk, Candace (School of Public Health)
Garvin, Theresa (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Springett, Jane (School of Public Health)
McGee, Tara (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-09-29T08:27:32Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study used participant photography and semi-structured interviews with 33 participants to explore the perceived health and well-being effects of natural area parks in the City of Edmonton, Alberta. Findings include that the proximity of the natural areas to residences was essential as it allowed visits to be frequent and spontaneous. Participants appreciated the areas for their wild and natural character and that they existed for the benefit of other species. While in these areas, participants felt away from the city and valued having this feeling while in the middle of the city. The sense of being away gave people space to think, connect with themselves, and return refreshed to their lives. The natural areas facilitated connections to self, companions (including dog companions), and other visitors. Many participants felt a deep intimacy with the natural areas over time and connections to birds, animals, and trees that live in them.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3HD7P16X
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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