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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3838D

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Quantitative and Qualitative Content Analysis of Breast Cancer, Heart Disease, and Stroke Media Messages from Local Canadian Media Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Cardiovascular disease
Breast Cancer
Media
Content Analysis
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Champion, Claudine C.
Supervisor and department
Berry, Tanya (Physical Education and Recreation)
Examining committee member and department
Clark, Alex (Nursing)
Spence, John (Physical Education and Recreation)
Department
Physical Education and Recreation
Specialization

Date accepted
2014-07-03T14:16:43Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study examined media coverage of breast cancer (N=145) and heart disease and stroke (N=39) news articles, videos, advertisements, and images in a local Canadian context through quantitative and thematic content analyses. Statistical analysis (Cramer’s V) revealed significant differences in placement (0.415, p < 0.01), survivors as source of information (0.204, p < 0.01), health agency (0.319, p < 0.001), human interest stories (0.183, p < 0.05), research study (0.177, p < 0.05), risk statistics (0.324, p < 0.001), preventative behaviours (0.347, p < 0.001), and tone (0.647, p < 0.001). Themes for breast cancer revealed a ‘typical’ breast cancer survivor and that ‘good’ citizens and businesses should help the cause. Themes for heart disease and stroke revealed individual responsibility and how fundraising reinforces femininity and privilege. Findings help reveal how these diseases are framed in local Canadian media. These frames may impact an individual’s understanding of the disease.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3838D
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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