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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3NP1WS5H

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Bringing the Body Back: Adults with Developmental Disabilities, Resistance, and Independence Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
BwO
Persons with Developmental Disabilities Program
independence
resistance
territorialization
developmental disabilities
agency
PDD
medical model of disability
body-self
Deleuze and Guattari
autonomy
body without organs
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Herzog, Kathleen Y
Supervisor and department
Shields, Rob (Sociology)
Strohschein, Lisa (Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Shields, Rob (Sociology)
Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy (Physical Education and Recreation)
Strohschein, Lisa (Sociology)
Department
Department of Sociology
Specialization

Date accepted
2014-12-18T15:52:55Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
In this thesis, I engage with the following research problem: how the body can practically, theoretically, and comprehensively be brought back into conversations of disability, while simultaneously acknowledging the agency (vis-à-vis independence) of individuals with disabilities as well as social factors. To address this problem, I interviewed Edmontonian adults with developmental disabilities who were part of the Persons with Developmental Disabilities Program (PDD). Additionally, I use Deleuze and Guattari’s theory of the body-without-organs (BwO), or body-self, to demonstrate that although use of the medical model of disability (by PDD and others) seeks to pathologize and medicalize (territorialize) this study’s participants, they attempted to resist this territorialization in their everyday lives through their relations with assistive designs and devices, medical procedures, family, and support staff. While participants were unfamiliar with “autonomy,” they were at ease with the term independence, which had unique meanings for them based on personal experiences and relationships.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3NP1WS5H
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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