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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3736B

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‘Doesn’t anyone want to pick a fight with me?’: masculinity in political humour about the 2008 Canadian federal election Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
gender
editorial cartoons
masculinity
political humour
Canadian politics
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Raphael, Daisy
Supervisor and department
Trimble, Linda (Political Science)
Examining committee member and department
Harder, Lois (Political Science)
Tinic, Serra (Sociology)
Department
Department of Political Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-08-22T18:07:21Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study explores the relationship between masculinity and political leadership as it was constructed in political humour about the 2008 Canadian federal election. I used content and discourse analysis methods to examine gendered depictions of the two frontrunners in that election – Stéphane Dion and Stephen Harper – in editorial cartoons and on the popular television programmes the Rick Mercer Report, 22 Minutes and the Royal Canadian Air Farce. Guiding this analysis is Connell’s ([1995] 2005) theory of masculinities. Ultimately, I argue that political satirists constructed a hierarchy of masculinities in their portrayals of Dion and Harper by depicting Dion as submissive, weak, effeminate and devoid of masculinity, while portraying Harper as hypermasculine, dominant, aggressive and violent. In doing so, I argue, Canadian political humourists contributed to the normalization of the purported connections between masculinity, power, and politics and to the social construction of politics as a ‘man’s world’.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3736B
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Raphael_Daisy_Fall 2011
File author: Daisy Raphael
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