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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3HP59

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Extrinsic contingency focus and reactions to idealized body images in advertising media Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Media
Self-Esteem
Idealized Body Images
Extrinsic Contingency Focus
Consumer Behavior
Advertising
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Williams, Todd John
Supervisor and department
Jeff Schimel (Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Michael Gillespie (Sociology)
Leendert Mos (Psychology)
John Precejus (Business)
Kimberly Noels (Psychology)
Clay Routledge (Psychology, North Dakota State University)
Jeff Schimel (Psychology)
Department
Department of Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-07-24T16:42:48Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
Using a recently developed measure of extrinsic contingency focus (ECF; Williams, Schimel, Hayes & Martens, 2009), four studies were conducted to examine the relationship between extrinsic contingency focus and the extent to which individuals strive to meet the social ideals shown in advertising media. In Study 1 it was found that ECF predicted participants’ desire for the image oriented aspects of consumer products. Study 2 demonstrated the moderating effects of ECF on women’s food consumption and preference for healthy foods following exposure to thin models. Study 3 showed that ECF also moderated reactions to idealized body images among males who were exposed to idealized images. Study 4 extended the results of the previous studies, by demonstrating that reactance to idealized images among low ECF women can be limited by affirming the intrinsic self. The implications of these findings relative to a multifaceted conceptualization of self-esteem and the use of idealized images in media are discussed.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3HP59
Rights
License granted by Todd Williams (tjw4@ualberta.ca) on 2009-07-15T15:32:31Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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