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Sequential Analysis with Applications to Clinical Trials Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
truncated sequential tests
sequential analysis
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Samuylova, Evgenia
Supervisor and department
Gombay, Edit (Math & Stat Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Dinu, Irina (Public Health Sciences)
Prasad, Narasimha (Math & Stat Sciences)
Department
Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences
Specialization
Statistics
Date accepted
2012-01-24T11:28:50Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The topic of the thesis is an overview of some sequential and change-point detection methods with applications to clinical trials. Performing sequential monitoring is important for ethical, economical and other reasons. It is important to terminate a study as soon as possible when potentially harmful treatments are used or when financial resources are limited. The modern theory of sequential testing of hypotheses started with works of Wald and Barnard on quality control of military supplies during World War II. Since then sequential methods received a lot of attention. In this thesis we consider application of truncated sequential methods to four different models. First, we consider sequential testing of composite hypotheses in the presence of nuisance parameters. Second, we describe sequential procedures for binary data with risk-adjustment. Then, we consider non-parametric methods for sequential monitoring of longitudinal data. We finish the thesis with an example of monitoring proportions in the context of waiting time at emergency departments in hospitals.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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