ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of When Pictures Waste a Thousand Words: Analysis of the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic on Television NewsDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3ZP3W029

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

School of Public Health

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Department of Public Health Sciences

When Pictures Waste a Thousand Words: Analysis of the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic on Television News Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Luth, Westerly
Jardine, Cindy
Bubela, Tania
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Canada
Vaccination and immunization
Communications
Alberta
Children
Vaccines
H1N1
Public and occupational health
Type of item
Research Material
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
OBJECTIVES: Effective communication by public health agencies during a pandemic promotes the adoption of recommended health behaviours. However, more information is not always the solution. Rather, attention must be paid to how information is communicated. Our study examines the television news, which combines video and audio content. We analyse (1) the content of television news about the H1N1 pandemic and vaccination campaign in Alberta, Canada; (2) the extent to which television news content conveyed key public health agency messages; (3) the extent of discrepancies in audio versus visual content. METHODS: We searched for \"swine flu\" and \"H1N1\" in local English news broadcasts from the CTV online video archive. We coded the audio and visual content of 47 news clips during the peak period of coverage from April to November 2009 and identified discrepancies between audio and visual content. RESULTS: The dominant themes on CTV news were the vaccination rollout, vaccine shortages, long line-ups (queues) at vaccination clinics and defensive responses by public health officials. There were discrepancies in the priority groups identified by the provincial health agency (Alberta Health and Wellness) and television news coverage as well as discrepancies between audio and visual content of news clips. Public health officials were presented in official settings rather than as public health practitioners. CONCLUSION: The news footage did not match the main public health messages about risk levels and priority groups. Public health agencies lost control of their message as the media focused on failures in the rollout of the vaccination campaign. Spokespeople can enhance their local credibility by emphasizing their role as public health practitioners. Public health agencies need to learn from the H1N1 pandemic so that future television communications do not add to public confusion, demonstrate bureaucratic ineffectiveness and contribute to low vaccination rates.
Date created
2014/10/24
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3ZP3W029
License information
Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivatives 3.0 Unported
Rights

Citation for previous publication
Luth W, Jardine C, Bubela T (2013) When Pictures Waste a Thousand Words: Analysis of the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic on Television News. PLoS One 8(5): e64070.
Source
Link to related item

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-11-14T18:04:01.281+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 484386
Last modified: 2015:10:12 11:22:49-06:00
Filename: PLOSO (8) (5) 2013.pdf
Original checksum: 8d21c167cdce5c75c36c7d7b245caec3
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: pone.0064070 1..10
Page count: 10
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date