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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3FW30

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Green biomass: characterization and fractionation of immature cereal crops Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
rye
wheat
cereal
stages
crops
growth
triticale
feedstock
immature
characterization
biorefining
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Brenner, Carla
Supervisor and department
Bressler, David C (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Temelli, Feral (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Examining committee member and department
Kumar, Amit (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-23T21:36:52Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The development of a biorefining process acknowledges the feedstock characterization as it can often dictate the process technology. The maturity stages of agricultural feedstocks also have the potential for altering the process conditions. Thus, the variability of growth stages at 4-6 leaf, flowering, milk and soft dough were assessed for use of immature cereal crops in a green biomass biorefinery. Hence, the primary objective of this project was to evaluate the composition of green biomass at different harvest stages. Four varieties of triticale, two wheat varieties and two rye varieties were analyzed for starch, protein, phenols, fatty acids and sterols. To further characterize the feedstocks, an alternate extraction strategy was explored based on solvent polarity. It was found that for triticale varieties, the milk to soft dough harvest stages showed a decrease in proteins and phenols content and an increase in starch content. This could potentially provide benefit to organic acid production through fermentation.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3FW30
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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